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What To Do When Your Interview Is Like a Bad First Date

My manager recently asked me to write a blog – sigh – I’m not one for blogging, Instagram is about it for me.  I rapidly realised that finding a topic is insanely hard and there were no light bulb moments happening on a Monday afternoon. I pretty quickly ended up on a far more interesting article ‘How To Get Out Of The Date From Hell’. As the author rightly states everyone needs an “undeniably kick-ass exit strategy” for that date when the person is a completely less photo shopped version of themselves in real life… I realise I am well off on a tangent here as I am sure you are asking what the relevance of this is to securing a career progressing job in the legal industry?

Well what do you do if you find yourself in a job interview and for whatever reason, this is NOT the job you signed up for. You completely give up and start thinking where to get a skinny latte at 4pm. How do you then exit that interview whilst maintaining your reputation. This is where the alignment to the disastrous date ends, unfortunately you can’t have your recruiter on speed dial for the “someone needs me” strategy. However, making a professional escape and protecting your reputation in a small market is still possible. Here’s how…

  • Maintain a respectful attitude and keep positive – Often there is more than one position on offer and chances are they might be considering you for more than one position that you aren’t across – Options are your best friend!
  • Treat the interview as an opportunity to network and build relationships – you never know who knows who.
  • Don’t make a snap judgement – You might be pleasantly surprised about the opportunities within the position for your career
  • Never ever walk out – Being uninterested or cutting an interview short can be just as detrimental.

Interviewing really can be like dating: you can’t control the outcome, some turn out great, while some don’t, the best thing to do is to make the most of the opportunity. If the job on offer isn’t a great fit for you, then keep looking for one that does!

Emma Weeber LLB.
Email:      emma@empiregroup.careers
Phone:     (03) 8602 7400

Why You Need a Recruiter to Get it Right

Why you need a recruiter to get it right by Emma Weeber LLB.

Often we are asked about the benefit of using a recruitment agency. There are loads of recruitment agencies in Australia, which in itself can be confusing. It can be a bit like shopping in that you need to try a few before you find the one (or two) that really ‘get’ you.

With so many jobs being advertised and the horrible feeling of not being considered for the roles you apply directly for; a well-connected agent can be exactly what you need. So, how can your recruiter help you?

  • It’s what we do! We have the active positions across practice areas and industry knowledge about what’s happening in the market and potential opportunities.
  • We have long established market contacts throughout Australia and also further abroad!
  • We can support you with finding a position that is going to be the best fit for you, both career wise and personally.
  • We can help you with tailoring your resume so it has the impact you need it to.
  • We also assist with interview preparation to help you impress in an interview.
  • If you have questions that you don’t feel comfortable to ask directly we can help!
  • We can describe the culture of a firm to you to ensure that you make a fully informed decision.
  • We support you right through the initial days, weeks and months of your new role, you will always have a sounding board with us!

When people put their trust in us to help them with such an important decision in their career, it’s not something that we take lightly. Using an agent shouldn’t feel like an annoying middle person, it should instead feel like a new support network and be an excellent way of understanding the market you are tackling and increasing your chances of success.

 

Emma Weeber LLB.

Email: emma@empiregroup.careers

DEVELOPING RAPPORT IN INTERVIEWS

DEVELOPING RAPPORT IN INTERVIEWS

Establishing rapport is one of the most essential elements to a good job interview. You know it when you feel it – you come away from an interview feeling like you made a connection with the interviewer and that the interview went well.   Rapport doesn’t have to be an accident – you can do your best to create it.  Here’s how:

Do your research

Read as much as you can about the organisation and the person who is interviewing you to see if there is a common connection there.  There are many connections such as the type of work, common connections, matter types, and personal interests, or you might have a friend working in the organisation.

Dress the part

Make sure you are dressed appropriately for the role.  If necessary look at Google Images for pictures of your interviewer to look at their style of dress.  Look  at images of others who work in the organisation.

Use a firm handshake when introduced

Male or female, always extend your right hand on introduction, and make eye contact and smile.

Use people’s names

Repeat the person’s name on introduction, for example saying ‘Nice to meet you, Frank’.  Not only will it help you remember the name but it develops a personal connection. Of course if the interviewer is an older person resist using the first name until you are invited to do so.

Make Eye Contact

Always look into people’s eyes when speaking and if more than one person make sure you direct your attention to both of them.  Your answer to any question should be directed predominantly to the person who asked it, but every now and then look at the other person to include them and make the answer conversational.

Body language

Your body language is very important in developing rapport.  Use ‘open’ body language – avoid crossing your arms, and keep a relaxed but upright posture.  Subtly mirror the interviewer’s body language where possible.

Be sincere

Notwithstanding all of the above, it is, of course, necessary to be sincere.  Rehearsed rapport will not create rapport, but may inhibit it.